CONTACT Photo Fest: Turf

April 1-May 14 2019​ |Opening Reception May 2

Darren Calabrese, Carl MacNeil, Dinao MacCormick, Chad Tobin, Steve Wadden

A collaborative exhibition of fictional, documentary, and contemplative photographs exploring literal and abstract concepts of home. It combines selections from ongoing personal projects of five Canadian photographers from the East Coast who comprise the Hot Fog Collective.

On a spectrum between place and feeling, individual meanings of home emerge. Turf asks how the individual shapes the place, and how the place shapes the individual.

The artists illustrate relationships with land, identity, community, and changing geographic and social landscapes. While raising questions about intuition and perception, they imagine home as a sense of being and creative process as a means of transportation.

Curated by Hot Fog Collective

Darren Calabrese

Turf 02

Atlantic Canadians are a coastal people. Living on the periphery, we are connected through our relationship with the sea – an existence that is both isolating and freeing. The tensions of living off the sea have long existed, but today the region is suffering through an historically high rate of unemployment that is forcing many to fight to hold onto their livelihoods, communities, and identity. This is a movement full of stories that, in concert, are both stark and life-affirming. Calabrese works to explore the relationships and communities formed along the eastern coastlines, which he believes are a pathway not only to our history, but to our future.

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Portraits of a Revolution: Marc Betsworth

Marc Betsworth 1

 

Portraits of a Revolution
March 1-31
Opening reception: March 1 6-9pm
Artist Talk: March 23 2-4pm

What is your process?

For these shots, I wanted to be as nimble as possible so I used a very simple one-light set up: a gridded beauty dish and a reflector – that’s it. I tended to use a gold reflector to warm up the tones. There’s a pattern of light I’m after and it can be elusive. It means playing with the angle of the reflector a lot. Beyond that,I focus on what my subject is giving me. Primarily, I’m looking for authentic moments – nothing too contrived. As a former musician, I find that music can be really helpful on that front. It inspires my approach and in a way, it can relax and direct the subject better than any verbal direction I can provide. Sometimes, if the music’s right, I can just sit back and wait until it naturally evokes the expression and mood I’m after.

The post process was a bit more involved. Given the era, I knew I wanted to employ a painterly look to the images but I didn’t want them to look too heavy handed or filtered. This meant applying a painterly texture as subtly as possible while preserving the “photographic” integrity of the image. Although I do use a tablet and tend to sculpt in the light, I’m not a fan of out-of-the-box “painterly” effects or brush strokes in a photographic image. To preserve authenticity and character, it was also important to ease up on the retouching.

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Noir/Chroma Spotlight: Kerry Hayes

Jan 3 – Feb 28 2019

Opening reception January 17 2019

Peter Dušek, Alan Dunlop, Susan Kerr, Kerry Hayes, Marlene Hilton Moore, Leah Oates

kerry hayes colour

What is your process

I never feel more present then when hunting with my camera. Senses on high alert, ready to pull the trigger to capture a fleeting instance when light, composition, gesture and moment come together. I am a non discriminatory predator, almost any game will do but it is strictly capture and release. Never more present then with with my camera I work with an empty, quiet mind, open to unconscious influences, seeking to capture an image that is greater then the sum of it’s parts. Or as Garry Winogrand’s beautifully expressed it, when “the photograph isn’t what was photographed, it is something else, a new fact”.
I shoot with three digital cameras but eschew any significance to particular brand or type of light recording device I use. I switch between two popular brands of high resolution digital cameras and a smart phone depending on the circumstance. The ultimate impact or enjoyment of my photography rests little on camera brand. The only really significant recording device is a photographers eye which can not be bought.
After editing tens of thousand of frames mere dozens get further attention. I work in Adobe Lightroom, adjusting the increasing breadth of variables which along with the sophistication of controls that software sliders give one today allows for tremendous post production manipulation to refine your vision.

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Noir/Chroma Spotlight:Peter Dušek

Jan 3 – Feb 28 2019

Opening reception January 17 2019

Peter Dušek, Alan Dunlop, Susan Kerr, Kerry Hayes, Marlene Hilton Moore, Leah Oates

Hush

Hush

What is your process

My process is one of great searching for a something in nature, uncluttered, yet in perfect balance, that best represents the essence of the world. I try to look for the small, overlooked aspects, and rarely the obvious. These elements can be found everywhere, but they are often lost among nature’s or manmade chaos, so it is difficult to find them in a way that they can be isolated and shown to the viewer. My motto is “as little as possible, as much as necessary” leading to the perfect balance between too little and too much. I often find myself, like a painter, subtracting from what I see, whether it’s in the camera using camera placement, darkness, fog or a snow storm to hide or reveal “just enough”. Later, on the computer, I often subtract clutter that distracts; clutter that when looking at the scene, the eye may see but the mind ignores. I often photograph in the winter on snow, using its lightness, along with the sky, as an empty canvas, only adding the “brush strokes” of the objects that I want to show.

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Noir/Chroma Spotlight: Marlene Hilton Moore

Jan 3 – Feb 28 2019

Opening reception January 17 2019

Peter Dušek, Alan Dunlop, Susan Kerr, Kerry Hayes, Marlene Hilton Moore, Leah Oates

Sister to Botticelli_14555

What is your process?

My photography exclusively depicts photographs of an individual woman and her place. I approach the medium of photography conceptually and orchestrate each series to my vision of the individual woman who is the subject of the work. I develop a concept that integrates the woman, her place, and a dress and then I abandon to the joy of discovery. Fleeting glances, pointed gaze, and body language all reveal a distinctive identity. I allow the camera to be a critical tool but the evocative image is the defining ingredient.

Do you see common themes in all of your work?

Women and their place is the subject of my photographic work. There is the essential
theme of a woman, a place, a dress and a vision. Accidental elements of light, motion, and mood create unique moments that add to the resonance of each image.

In your opinion, what makes an image powerful.

Photographs that capture what is universally human yet exhibit personal and intimate
identities are powerful. Images presented within the framework of beauty and truth create indelible artwork.

Noir/Chroma Spotlight: Alan Dunlop

Jan 3 – Feb 28 2019

Opening reception January 17 2019

Peter Dušek, Alan Dunlop, Susan Kerr, Kerry Hayes, Marlene Hilton Moore, Leah Oates

Alan Noir

What is your process?

For several years now I have been pursuing my own creative vision, looking for ways to break the rules of traditional photography and transport the viewer to an alternate, more abstract reality. I think this quote by actress Mary Lou Cook says a lot “Creativity is inventing, experimenting, growing, taking risks, breaking the rules, making mistakes and having fun”.
My work has evolved from blending multiple images into collage-like works using Photoshop to – more recently – capturing fragmented images in-camera.

Do you see common themes in all of your work?

Whether photographing nature, people or the city streets the common theme is to explore time space and motion.

In your opinion, what makes an image powerful.

There are many elements that make a good picture, it can be the quality of the light, the angle, the subject matter, the overall composition.
Ultimately a good photograph, in my opinion, is one that makes people stop, take a second look and ask questions. It should communicate something to the viewer, draw them in, tell a story, and arouse some emotion.

Alan Chroma

Noir/Chroma Spotlight: Susan Kerr

Jan 3 – Feb 28 2019

Opening reception January 17 2019

Peter Dušek, Alan Dunlop, Susan Kerr, Kerry Hayes, Marlene Hilton Moore, Leah Oates

Tofino20SK

Tofino #20

What is your process?

Both the Noir image and the Chroma image were captured digitally. I like to wander until I find something that moves me; I really need to feel inspired to take a picture.

Initially, I sort through my images, pick the ones I like, and rate them. Then I let them sit for quite a while before I go back and make final selections. It’s an ongoing process that takes time to select the images that I want to print and display.

Do you see common themes in all of your work?

Generally, yes and particularly with these images. I am looking for more than a “tree” or “kelp” I want to find the essence of my subject and hope to bring that to the viewer, to show what may go unnoticed; not only visually, but also in terms of the feeling that one experiences when near the subjects.

In your opinion, what makes an image powerful?

I think an image is more powerful when the photographer feels a real connection to their subject and there is some understanding of what is going on in front of the camera.
For example, there is more to a forest than just trees.
There are many collaborations taking place. For me the old growth forest, its elements and the interactions provide a somewhat mystical experience.
In addition, there must be technical understanding so that what you want to present looks as you intended. The capture, the post production, and the final print must be executed with technical expertise.
However, that is not enough if the photograph does not convey to the viewer what the
photographer intended.

Untitled#1

Nereocystis luetkeana