Noir/Chroma Spotlight: Marlene Hilton Moore

Jan 3 – Feb 28 2019

Opening reception January 17 2019

Peter Dušek, Alan Dunlop, Susan Kerr, Kerry Hayes, Marlene Hilton Moore, Leah Oates

Sister to Botticelli_14555

What is your process?

My photography exclusively depicts photographs of an individual woman and her place. I approach the medium of photography conceptually and orchestrate each series to my vision of the individual woman who is the subject of the work. I develop a concept that integrates the woman, her place, and a dress and then I abandon to the joy of discovery. Fleeting glances, pointed gaze, and body language all reveal a distinctive identity. I allow the camera to be a critical tool but the evocative image is the defining ingredient.

Do you see common themes in all of your work?

Women and their place is the subject of my photographic work. There is the essential
theme of a woman, a place, a dress and a vision. Accidental elements of light, motion, and mood create unique moments that add to the resonance of each image.

In your opinion, what makes an image powerful.

Photographs that capture what is universally human yet exhibit personal and intimate
identities are powerful. Images presented within the framework of beauty and truth create indelible artwork.

Artist Spotlight: Lorraine Parow

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze

February 1-February 28

Opening Reception February 8 | Artist Talks February 10

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze presents six artists who are telling their stories through the photographic lens. Lisa Murzin, Shelagh Howard, Marlene Hilton Moore, Lorraine Parow, Janet Holmes and Lauren Young share a variety of work for this exhibition hailing from different backgrounds, generations and experiences.

 

Parow_Courage

Statement

“Letting The Girls Fly’ provokes an intimate invitation to explore the individual discoveries in each tiny documentary framed photograph. These tiny images are of posters, hand written by women and placed throughout the woods. They contain simple truths. They are small reminders to be delighted by, and heal through. They are intended to invoke memory, to empower and inspire inclusion. They are positive ‘flash cards’.

How has your photographic process been informed by your experiences

Two stages of major developmental influences inform my photo-based imagery, before college and since college (grad of 1980) Before college (1977) In my life I communed with nature from the beginning, partially because it was so fascinating, ever evolving and utterly captivating and magical. Creation fascinated me. Nature and natural light with it’s endless variations moved me.

As it would be discovered in my mid thirties. Throughout my life I’d suffered from an impairment of my vision, leaving me compensating and working hard to overcome everyday life in a very strained manner. I know now when I reflect upon those decades of difficulty I recognize in hind sight that in fact I knew to find a quiet refuge in nature from the beginning. I developed a profound work ethic to keep up with my eye impairment disadvantage. It would turn out that I learned exceptional discipline on the track team where by our school happen to have an Olympic track coach who would impart his wisdom in such a manner that to this day I continue with much of his methods to make a commitment to gain ‘my personal best’.

In my senior year in high school I was confronted with the decision to further my education with either track or photography. This would require and either/or decision as each advanced education institution would be in different ends of the province. I focused on photography. My education changed my life, it consists of a 3 year photographic arts program, a 3 year advanced digital photography program, a 2 year painting, sculpture, drawing, 3D design program. I admired the real image achieved in the analogue optical format that a camera provided. It gave me the real thing when my eyes could not exactly do so. I set out to create a career in the photographic community since 1980.

This stage two has transformed my sensitivity to colour as a custom cibachrome printer for decades, to light as a location photographer, to the arts an assistant photographic gallery curator and production manager, and to production as a shooter for fantastic clients and magazines and stock agencies. Plus I continued through out these decades fine tuning many bodies of photo-based art work. I was also printing, framing and showing annually in a variety of remarkably diverse and accessible venues.

I continue to have a passion to seek out, to find beauty in the everyday, to create a positive impact, to discover ways to share images and ultimately to stop the moment in someone’s everyday life to create a single pause, a resting moment. I want to interrupt a person’s routine to share a simple moment with an image I’d discovered. It is with the recovery of my eye impairment since the mid 90’s that I enthusiastically embrace the everyday with a renewed sense of this freedom. I just want to shoot, share and celebrate the possibility in the everyday.

Artist Spotlight: Lauren Young

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze

February 1-February 28

Opening Reception February 8 | Artist Talks February 10

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze presents six artists who are telling their stories through the photographic lens. Lisa Murzin, Shelagh Howard, Marlene Hilton Moore, Lorraine Parow, Janet Holmes and Lauren Young share a variety of work for this exhibition hailing from different backgrounds, generations and experiences.

Ruby1-©LaurenCHoward.jpg

Statement

I think the mark of a good image is if it tells a good story. When I look at these images, I see a story about the relationship between young girls. It’s about the things we go through, the people we love or hate, and the looks we give each other when something interesting happens. I wanted to capture these faces so that I could look back on them and see the differences between ourselves now and then. This project allows me to document such a prevalent time in the lives of the people closest to me as we go through such pivotal shared experiences.

How has your photographic process been informed by your experiences

I photograph the things I see in life, the moments I experience. My goal for every picture I take is to capture an intimate moment shared between me and the subject, this is why having some sort of relationship with the subject is quite important to me. I am constantly trying to have unique experiences with those whom I photograph. Being a teenage girl myself, it makes the most sense for me to take pictures of my closest friends as they go through the same things I am.

Artist Spotlight: Marlene Hilton Moore

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze

February 1-February 28

Opening Reception February 8 | Artist Talks February 10

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze presents six artists who are telling their stories through the photographic lens. Lisa Murzin, Shelagh Howard, Marlene Hilton Moore, Lorraine Parow, Janet Holmes and Lauren Young share a variety of work for this exhibition hailing from different backgrounds, generations and experiences.

Pixie's World Animation 1 Levels2_eml.jpg

Statement

I enjoy the collective within the world of women. In my photographs I see each woman
through my own eyes first and I orchestrate the scene to my version of them. Once the
scene is set I abandon to the joy of discovery as each woman reveals herself
unencumbered by my vision. Fleeting glances, pointed gaze, body language all reveal a
distinctive identity.

How has your photographic process been informed by your experiences

Two accidental elements in my initial photo shoot contributed to my photographic process – continuous motion and specific light. In this initial series, Pixie’s World, I instructed the woman to constantly move so that she would forget about the camera and be her natural self. I shot continuously and the result was full of narrative. I also discovered as a result of the movement that many of the blurred images were not discards but were mysterious and valuable. Each of my photo shoots now involves hundreds of images and these images provide a story-telling reality even within my mise en scène conceptual approach.
In this initial photo shoot also I used a single available light source that created a spotlight effect to unusual results. In subsequent shoots I used the light of the moment – natural daylight diffused through historic barn boards, brilliant sea light and blistering city and beach sun played their part.
I realized that reacting instinctively to the moment, the woman and the place was an asset, which became my mandate in all subsequent sessions.

Artist Spotlight: Shelagh Howard

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze

February 1-February 28

Opening Reception February 8 | Artist Talks February 10

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze presents six artists who are telling their stories through the photographic lens. Lisa Murzin, Shelagh Howard, Marlene Hilton Moore, Lorraine Parow, Janet Holmes and Lauren Young share a variety of work for this exhibition hailing from different backgrounds, generations and experiences.

ThreeGraces_1086©ShelaghHoward

Statement

When photographing the body rather than focusing on the face, the image for me
becomes much more about the essence of people, rather than about the individual being
photographed. The blurred motion shadows that follow and surround these figures evoke our ability to carry within us multitudes – often simultaneously, always over time. We can be with others but alone, or alone but connected. A single moment can embody rage, calm, love, uncertainty, passion, and fear, as well as memories of previous moments. A fleeting instant in a person’s life can arguably be documented by a portrait. It is the question of exploring the diversity of experience that we hold within us that this work examines.

How has your photographic process been informed by your experiences

We all move through the world in our bodies. They carry evidence of our genetics, as
well as the ways we choose to alter, adorn and present them. I have walked through the
world as a girl and then as a woman, and there is no question that this experience has
influenced the way I have been seen, as well as the way I have perceived myself. With
the #metoo movement gaining force all around us, the fact that being a woman carries
with it many vulnerabilities and disadvantages needs no introduction nor debate. The flip side of that is the powerful sisterhood that women possess, evidenced by the phenomenal support for the women’s marches we have seen in the past year, and also in the way we have cared for each other on a daily basis, throughout history. We are daughters, sisters, mothers, friends, mentors, partners. As communicators and nurturers, we touch, hold, listen and hear. We struggle, are joyous, hurt, and soothe, ourselves and each other. We are naked often literally, but also figuratively: raw, open and vulnerable with each other in a way will always fascinate me, and which I am driven to explore and to capture.

 

Artist Spotlight: Lisa Murzin

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze

February 1-February 28

Opening Reception February 8 | Artist Talks February 10

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze presents six artists who are telling their stories through the photographic lens. Lisa Murzin, Shelagh Howard, Marlene Hilton Moore, Lorraine Parrow, Janet Holmes and Lauren Young share a variety of work for this exhibition hailing from different backgrounds, generations and experiences.

LisaMurzin_Mark-September1993.jpg

Statement

For Mark, showering is a meditative experience; he claims “I do all my thinking in the shower”. When the opportunity arrives, I will watch him, enjoying his gestures of bathing and contemplation.  And I find in that experience a sense of beauty in the vulnerability and mystery of his thoughts.

How has your photographic process been informed by your experiences

Relationships ebb and flow on a solitary wave; I’ve been married to Mark for 25 years and continue to experience those moments when he’s alone with his thoughts.
As a visual artist, feeling these moments from my subjects, whether portraits of people or nature allows the peace for me to tune in to them. Sometimes, I will stay in observation and let the image go.

 

Emergence Spotlight | Marlene Hilton Moore

December 1-January 8 2018 | Opening December 7 2017 6-9pm

Emergence showcases the work of a group of photographers who are presenting new and exciting work. This is the second iteration of this exhibition in which four artists will be chosen to exhibit in Montreal in 2018.

Lindsi Hollend |Anna Borcherdt |Adrian Oosterman |Cat StambolicAndrew Persaud

Marlene Hilton Moore | Raquel Moliterno

Botticelli Runner 3338 web

What is your process
I create my photographs of women from the perspective of concept. The woman, her place and the combination of the two can spark my ideas. I do not concentrate on photographic technique but let the concept and the situation develop the technique. It may be there is a special source of light or simply bright daylight. It may be a choice between a focus on the woman from a distance immersed in her place or a focus on her portrait. In my series Pixie’s World, the place of Pixie’s bachelor apartment was a given, but it was the accident of the single-source light that created mysterious shadows and brilliant highlights. Combined with the light were the idiosyncratic personality of Pixie and the collision of her art and body within the space.
The series Cathedral focused explicitly on the concept of an elderly urban woman in a silver gown returned to her rural roots and photographed in her family barn. The woman’s white hair, the molten silver gown and the light that filtered through the spaces between the boards of the barn once again created a unique environment of light and luminescence, which greatly shaped the photographs.
The two series Ancestral and Botticelli Runner were shot in bright daylight. In Ancestral the central technique was the conceptual combination of the woman in the Baie de Chaleur moonscape rocks that dwarfed her, counterpointed with her posed against the ancestral homestead in intimate portrait relationship.
The young woman who is a Botticelli vision with her complexion and red hair is a long
distance runner. I was intrigued by the contrast of the delicacy of my Botticelli vision
against the hard reality of her long distance running discipline. Softness and hardness –
rigidity of track and flow of beach sand as running places – softness of flowing red hair and pink velvet gown against the rigidity of developed muscle. These elements became the focus of the photographs.

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