Portfolio Workshop December 2018

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What: Portfolio Workshop

Where: Alternative Photo Services at 1840 Danforth Ave, Toronto

When: December 27-December 30 2018

Spots: Minimum 4 maximum 6

Cost: $1,000 plus tax + materials (material list provided upon request)

This workshop is for anyone who is looking to build a portfolio of alternative prints. Students will be printing their own work under the guidance of printer Bob Carnie using gum bichromate and/or platinum palladium.

Print sizes range from 8×10 all the way up to 20×28.

Once the prints are finished, they will be custom matted using cotton rag 4 ply board.

To sign up or ask a question, email Bob or Carissa

bob@alternativephotoservices.com

carissa@alternativephotoservices.com

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Call for submissions |Chroma

Chroma

Bob Carnie

Description

The Connections Gallery is seeking submissions for a large colour print photo exhibition.

Photographers will each have one 30″x37″ OR 30″x30″ mounted print in this six week exhibition. Celebrating colour, Chroma will present the work of ten artists.

This exhibition is being printed in its entirety by Bob Carnie, each photographer will receive their mounted print once the show comes down. Bob will work together with the photographers to choose their best image. Promoting the printer/photographer dynamic, printing will be a collaborative effort.

Images exhibited will make a study of colour.

 

Dates

Feb 18- March 31 2019

Reception: February 21 6-9pm

 

Deadline to apply: October 1

 

Logistics

Each artist has 1- 30″x37″ OR 30″x30″ ink jet print in this exhibition.

Exhibition fee + Production: $700 plus tax


 

Submissions

Send up to 5-10 JPEGS

Bio

Statement

If you would like to submit your own prints, please contact us


Contact

Carissa Ainslie carissa@alternativephotoservices.com

1840 Danforth Ave | 416.778.6969

Call for Submissions | Noir

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Bob Carnie

Description

The Connections Gallery is seeking submissions for a large black and white photo exhibition.

Photographers will each have one 30″x37″ OR 30″x30″ mounted print in this six week exhibition. Celebrating black and white photography, Noir will present the work of ten artists.

This exhibition is being printed in its entirety by Bob Carnie, each photographer will receive their mounted print once the show comes down. There are two choices for production methods of images. The hybrid historical-contemporary Lambda will be used to produce the silver gelatin prints, or artists can have their work printed via inkjet. Bob will work together with the photographers to choose their best image and printing method. Promoting the printer/photographer dynamic, printing will be a collaborative effort.

Images exhibited will explore the exquisite composition of black and white photography.

Continue reading

Vancouver and Capture!

Carissa just returned from Vancouver where she was stationed for ten days. We rented a pop up space for two weeks in Chinatown, installing Series, Clearcut and Ipseity.

Series

From Front 2

SERIES brings together five photographers with five different stories to tell. Salina Kassam, Thomas Brasch, Larry D. Hayden and Skip Dean have explored their own environments through the photographic medium.


Clearcut

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The intersection of man and nature is a dominant theme in Matthew Plexman’s work. Clearcut captures the evolution of an old logging road in northeastern Ontario: old sections are blocked off and new routes added, leading to new areas of logging activity. The borders between clearcut and forest are abrupt at first—open areas of chewed-up earth and toppled trees abut untouched woodland. Over time, the process of healing begins and the borders blur. Plexman attempts to find beauty and symmetry in the tension between destruction and regeneration, inviting dialogue about the conflict inherent in our dependence on nature for both resource extraction and emotional sustenance.


 

Meeting New People

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Carissa had the pleasure of meeting some really interesting folks on her travels. Sally Buck and Kent Lins popped up their photos in cube vans every weekend during the Capture Photo Fest.

She also got a fantastic tour of the new Emily Carr University campus by photo studio tech Geoffrey, and met up with Kathy from Beau Photo.

With a bit of down time, she also got to take in some of the sights of Vancouver and Whistler.

 

 

Pigment NYC and Toronto

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Pigment is a group photography exhibition that explores the concept of colour through the historical gum bichromate process. Each photographer has two prints in the show, printed by Bob Carnie.

Artists

Lori Ryerson, Linda Kooluris Dobbs, Bryan Helm, Bob Carnie, Shelagh Howard, Thomas Brasch Brendan Meadows, Ian Campbell, Cory Wilyman, Lorraine Parow, Guy Lafontaine, Paulette Michayluk, Janet Holmes, Alan Dunlop, Laura Paterson

*New York April 6 and 7 Bushwick Community Darkroom*

Pigment will pop up at the Bushwick Community Darkroom April 6 and 7 2018. These dates were chosen so that participating artists who wish to visit the city during the exhibition can attend The Photography Show presented by AIPAD.

Facebook event HERE

*Toronto | May 2-June 29 Lonsdale Gallery*

The prints will return to Toronto where they will become a part of Red Light, an exhibition at Lonsdale Gallery. This juried salon show will exclusively feature alternative prints by artists from around the world. Red Light is a feature show in the CONTACT Photo Festival.

Lori Ryerson Gum Bichromate-Prop Plane, Deer Lake

Lori Ryerson

 

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Alan Dunlop

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Thomas Brasch

Artist Spotlight: Janet Holmes

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze

February 1-February 28

Opening Reception February 8 | Artist Talks February 10

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze presents six artists who are telling their stories through the photographic lens. Lisa Murzin, Shelagh Howard, Marlene Hilton Moore, Lorraine Parow, Janet Holmes and Lauren Young share a variety of work for this exhibition hailing from different backgrounds, generations and experiences.

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Statement

I have always loved animals, but for many years I was afraid to get involved with animal rescue because I couldn’t imagine how I would deal with the heartbreak. A few years ago, I decided that animals needed me more than I needed to be comfortable, and I began volunteering for animal rescue groups as a photographer and caregiver.
In January 2017, during my volunteer shift at the Wild Bird Fund in New York City, I met a hen who was suffering from severe and chronic reproductive illness. I discovered that her ailments were common for chickens like her. As I learned more about chickens, I discovered a network of vegans (primarily women) who rescue and care for them. I thought about how so many women still struggle to control their own bodies and obtain adequate reproductive health care, and how people in turn are socialized to exploit hens’ reproductive systems. Even across species, it seems that society expects to dictate how females use their own bodies.
And so I began photographing these chickens and their rescuers to pay tribute both to the birds who have suffered so much and the women who invest so much love, time and money caring for them.

How has your photographic process been informed by your experiences

As I spent more time experiencing animals as individuals through the lens of my camera, I began questioning how I could profess to love them yet continue exploiting them for food, clothing and other materials. I committed to become vegan and use photography to advocate for animal liberation.

My values as a vegan influence the subjects I photograph, the materials I use, and how I make photographs. For example, I avoid as much as possible any materials (like gelatin in traditional film and certain papers) that are derived from animals. As part of my photographic process, I sit with my animal subjects, witnessing their existence and importance as individuals, not objects. I invite them to experience me through sight, smell, touch and taste – on their own terms and in their own time. When possible, I photograph them at eye level to emphasize the parity between (human) viewer and subject.

In this series of portraits, I’ve expanded the frame to include animals with their rescuers. My goals are to highlight the deep bond between chickens and their people, pay tribute both to the birds who have suffered so much and the people who have invested so much time, money, love and tears in rescuing and caring for the birds, and encourage viewers to see chickens as sensitive beings worthy of our respect and protection.

50% of the profits from sales of work in this series will be donated to The Microsanctuary Movement’s Hen Reproductive Health Care Fund (www.microsanctuarymovement.org) to help caregivers cover the cost of contraception and other reproductive health care services provided by veterinarians.

 

Service Spotlight: Inkjet

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Courtesy Rita Leistner / Stephen Bulger Gallery

I have been making colour prints now my whole career, in my past jobs before I opened my own shop, I worked  in many capacities as a colour corrector, colour printer and photo comp specialist. One of my past specialty’s was making mural prints from 8×10 colour film. Thirty years later, we are seeing the same quality from the new Phase Back systems.
For me making colour prints is magical and even though we have state of art white balance capabilities, thanks to technology advances, the fine print always need collaboration with the artist and printer. Subtle colour balances, or contrast changes are required to produce work that is outstanding.
For many of my clients I work very closely balancing a body of work so that it can hang cohesively together, this is not a simple task. As well striking the right balance requires testing and then final print.
Today I use a Canon 12 ink printer and my maximum size (to date) is the image above which is 60 x 77 inches. I like inkjet for the different papers that we can use, as well with good profiling the consistency assured print to print. Inkjet prints can be hung within box frames, can be mounted to dibond mounts for displays, using spacers within frames or aluminum mounting systems to hang on walls.