Pigment NYC and Toronto

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Pigment is a group photography exhibition that explores the concept of colour through the historical gum bichromate process. Each photographer has two prints in the show, printed by Bob Carnie.

Artists

Lori Ryerson, Linda Kooluris Dobbs, Bryan Helm, Bob Carnie, Shelagh Howard, Thomas Brasch Brendan Meadows, Ian Campbell, Cory Wilyman, Lorraine Parow, Guy Lafontaine, Paulette Michayluk, Janet Holmes, Alan Dunlop, Laura Paterson

*New York April 6 and 7 Bushwick Community Darkroom*

Pigment will pop up at the Bushwick Community Darkroom April 6 and 7 2018. These dates were chosen so that participating artists who wish to visit the city during the exhibition can attend The Photography Show presented by AIPAD.

Facebook event HERE

*Toronto | May 2-June 29 Lonsdale Gallery*

The prints will return to Toronto where they will become a part of Red Light, an exhibition at Lonsdale Gallery. This juried salon show will exclusively feature alternative prints by artists from around the world. Red Light is a feature show in the CONTACT Photo Festival.

Lori Ryerson Gum Bichromate-Prop Plane, Deer Lake

Lori Ryerson

 

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Alan Dunlop

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Thomas Brasch

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In En Transition Spotlight: Guy Lafontaine

In/En Transition

March 1-31 2018  | Opening Reception March 2 | Artist talk March 3

In/En Transition presents an exchange of photography by exhibiting six Quebec artists in Toronto, and six Ontario artists in Montreal, reinforcing a sense of community between the two provinces.

Artists- Toronto- Connections Gallery
André DenisNathalie GarceauJudith BellavanceCaroline HayeurJean-Francois Leblanc, Guy Lafontaine

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How has your process changed over your career as a photographer?

My process has evolved from basic film cameras to medium format to large format cameras. Then to digital cameras, from basic ones to a higher end one. Through all my years in photography, I got to know and use a broad range of cameras and equipment. But I always saw the equipment I use only as tools that allow to bring to life my vision.

Using solely digital cameras for several years now, I see the benefits of ease of use and the bonus of seeing my results instantly. In the film days, any new project had its financial burden, with digital cameras the costs for a new project have gone down and allow me to consider more projects as feasible.

Bio

I have been living and working in Montreal for the last 30 years. Working as a professional mechanical designer for all my whole career, I have an insider’s view of the industrial environments, equipments and un-common places on which I get to intervene, either as a mechanical designer or as a photographer for my personal documentary projects. My dual background allows me to create visually strong and well structured images that can have a meaningful informative side as well.

As a self-educated photographer/curator, I evolved through the various projects that I create, slowly building myself a strong artistic experience along the way. As the american photographer Walker Evans stated, I describe myself as “documentary style” photographer. Subjects that I worked on through the years are: several large manufacturing industries (either about to close and or being drastically transformed), a major paper mill in the closing process, an hotel/convention centre complex being demolished, the largest nuclear bunker in Canada between it’s active and it’s museum period, hydro power plants, downtown store front reflections and various urban landscapes of humble worker’s houses alongside industrial sites, highways, railroads and major power lines.

In En Transition Spotlight: Caroline Hayeur

In/En Transition

March 1-31 2018  | Opening Reception March 2 | Artist talk March 3

In/En Transition presents an exchange of photography by exhibiting six Quebec artists in Toronto, and six Ontario artists in Montreal, reinforcing a sense of community between the two provinces.

Artists- Toronto- Connections Gallery
André DenisNathalie GarceauJudith Bellavance, Caroline Hayeur, Jean-Francois LeblancGuy Lafontaine

Shanghai

How has your process changed over your career as a photographer?
I have been working in documentary photography since the early 1990s, and making the transition to digital is definitely the biggest change I have had to go through. Although the change was a lot of work, I am not nostalgic about silver based photography. I embraced the new technology and started playing with these new possibilities, creating montages, digital patterns, and creating music videos and live multimedia performances. This has allowed me to expand my practice into movement and sound, as well as working in collaboration with multidisciplinary artists.

Bio

The ever-optimistic artist Caroline Hayeur focuses on themes of humanity, emotion and
connections between people through a practice deeply rooted in the present moment. Drawing on her experience of field photography since in the early 1990s, she is interested in concepts of place and home in various forms of relationship: friendship, families and broader communities.
In the spirit of documentary storytelling and humanistic portrait, her work illuminates
surprising connections between subjects through juxtaposition and proximity. Many of her projects began as artist residencies and community art, either in Quebec or internationally.
In 1997, FESTIVE RITUAL: PORTRAITS OF THE MONTREAL RAVE SCENE marked the
beginning of a long-term exploration into the world of nightlife and dance. After it’s exhibition during The Mois de la Photo à Montréal, the show toured worldwide through the FNAC Photo galleries (France, Europe and Asia) for over ten years. FESTIVE RITUAL, TANZ PARTY and later AMALGAT: DANSE, TRADITION ET AUTRES SPIRITUALITES (2003-2007) address the theme of the body-in- movement and have been presented as books, websites and exhibition tours. HUMANITAS, a series of portraits showing extreme emotion from birth to death, is presented several times in Quebec and also in Toulouse (France) during the festival ManifestO in 2013. With ADOLAND, she pursues her voyage in the world of adolescence. Her latest project named ABRAZO return in the field of dance, true the practice of tango from Buenos Aires to Montreal.
Since 1994, Caroline Hayeur has been a member of the Montreal-based Collectif Stock Photo — a group of independent photojournalists. In 2012, the collective celebrated its 25 th anniversary with the exhibition 25 YEARS OF STORIES under the artistic direction of Hayeur, with a dozen photographers presenting retrospective work at the Zoom Photo Festival Saguenay International
Meeting of Photojournalism. She was also Zoom speaker of honour in 2013. Hayeur collaborates among others with the ONF Interractif since the debuts of the studio.
Caroline Hayeur teaches photojournalism at l’École des médias, Faculty of communications at The Université du Québec à Montréal.

In En Transition Spotlight: Jean-Francois Leblanc

In/En Transition

March 2-31 2018  | Opening Reception March 2 | Artist talk March 3

In/En Transition presents an exchange of photography by exhibiting six Quebec artists in Toronto, and six Ontario artists in Montreal, reinforcing a sense of community between the two provinces.

Artists- Toronto- Connections Gallery
André DenisNathalie GarceauJudith BellavanceCaroline Hayeur, Jean-Francois Leblanc, Guy Lafontaine

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How has your process changed over your career as a photographer?

I believe a good image should not only contain information that invites reflection, but also be aesthetically pleasing and trigger emotion. It must be self-explanatory, and not require words. In my practice, photography is a means of recording a scene directly, without artifice. The image is constructed when it is shot, and not subjected to major modifications afterwards. This concept of photography respects the ethics of photojournalism and the documentary process. Subjectivity and creativity are expressed in the choices made and in the very act of photographing and not in subsequent image alteration.

Bio

Jean-François Leblanc has dedicated himself to photography since 1982, when he got his
Bachelor’s degree in Communications at l’Université du Québec à Montréal. He started his career as a photographer while working for many neighborhood community newspapers in Montreal. In 1984, he became the official photographer of Montreal’s International Jazz Festival. In 1987, while working full-time for Le Matin, a new Montreal daily, he decided to create Agence Stock Photo, a collective of photographers committed to photojournalism.
His artistic approach has always been coherent during his career as a photographer. The
recipient of grants from the Canada Council for the Arts and the Conseil des Arts et Lettres du Québec, he has presented, since 1984, many exhibitions on his personal projects at, among others, the Montreal Maisons de la Culture network, and also during the Mois de la Photo period in Montreal. Abroad, his work was presented in Mexico during the Mes de la Foto in Merida, in over forty Europeans cities through the FNAC galleries network and during the Rencontres Internationales de la Photo d’Arles in France. His work can be found in the collections of the Quebec National Museum of Fine Art, the network Accès-culture of the City of Montreal ( PADORAC), the Cirque du Soleil and Post Canada.

In En Transition Spotlight: Nathalie Garceau

In/En Transition

March 1-31 2018  | Opening Reception March 2 | Artist talk March 3

In/En Transition presents an exchange of photography by exhibiting six Quebec artists in Toronto, and six Ontario artists in Montreal, reinforcing a sense of community between the two provinces.

Artists- Toronto- Connections Gallery
André Denis, Nathalie Garceau, Judith BellavanceCaroline HayeurJean-Francois LeblancGuy Lafontaine

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How has your process changed over your career as a photographer?

In the beginning, I was always searching for the “perfect” image in the photos I
would make.  At that time the process was almost entirely externalized.
More and more, however, the process now takes place within myself.  I store
potential images that only exist in my imagination, organizing and filtering them
subconsciously, yet still aware of the process.  My creative process now is a
more visceral than cerebral endeavour.  Thus, the act of composing and making
a photograph becomes the final act in an process that increasingly begins within
myself.

Bio

I was born on March 24th, 1972 in Montreal.
A self-taught photographer, I became interested in photography well before the advent of digital technology. Although I have been practicing photography for almost twenty years now, it has mainly been since 2013 that my work has been shown in group exhibitions, as well as in duet with Montreal photographer Daniel Miller.
Most of my work is done in black and white. I am also just as interested in digital technology as in medium format film. Street photography, landscapes and large format portraits are the subjects which fascinate me the most. Whether it be in terms of shooting, processing or printing, the quality of my work is essential.
For me, photography goes well beyond the release of the shutter. I try to suggest a reflection or a perspective of multiple emotions upon the human condition – collectively, or as an individual. Thus, it should be no surprise that I have chosen to work in both social work and photography for so many years.
Since 2013, I have participated in several exhibitions in Montreal and Toronto.

 

Service Spotlight: Lith Prints from Negative

Cory 23 and front smaller

Image courtesy – Cory Wilyman

I have been making lith prints on silver gelatin paper for clients since the mid 90’s. I was introduced to Star Trax a book by Anton Corjbin. The images in this book were all printed by Mike Spry and were jaw droppingly beautiful to me.

Over the years I have used many papers and as chemicals died off have pretty much stayed with Fotospeed LD20 as the developer. In this process we use the emergence time in the developer to determine pull time, certain papers require different Snatch Points and each paper will exhibit a different tonal effect.

In all cases Lith prints are processed after developer exactly like any silver gelatin print and can be toned as well to create further variations.

These prints are highly desirable as they will outlast modern day prints and thus are coveted by collectors and galleries.

Almost any type of negative, colour or black and white will work with this process and one needs to be careful trying to match prints for editions as it is almost impossible to do so.

Therefore I refer to any Lith Print as a unique print

Service Spotlight: Inkjet

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Courtesy Rita Leistner / Stephen Bulger Gallery

I have been making colour prints now my whole career, in my past jobs before I opened my own shop, I worked  in many capacities as a colour corrector, colour printer and photo comp specialist. One of my past specialty’s was making mural prints from 8×10 colour film. Thirty years later, we are seeing the same quality from the new Phase Back systems.
For me making colour prints is magical and even though we have state of art white balance capabilities, thanks to technology advances, the fine print always need collaboration with the artist and printer. Subtle colour balances, or contrast changes are required to produce work that is outstanding.
For many of my clients I work very closely balancing a body of work so that it can hang cohesively together, this is not a simple task. As well striking the right balance requires testing and then final print.
Today I use a Canon 12 ink printer and my maximum size (to date) is the image above which is 60 x 77 inches. I like inkjet for the different papers that we can use, as well with good profiling the consistency assured print to print. Inkjet prints can be hung within box frames, can be mounted to dibond mounts for displays, using spacers within frames or aluminum mounting systems to hang on walls.