Portfolio Workshop December 2018

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What: Portfolio Workshop

Where: Alternative Photo Services at 1840 Danforth Ave, Toronto

When: December 27-December 30 2018

Spots: Minimum 4 maximum 6

Cost: $1,000 plus tax + materials (material list provided upon request)

This workshop is for anyone who is looking to build a portfolio of alternative prints. Students will be printing their own work under the guidance of printer Bob Carnie using gum bichromate and/or platinum palladium.

Print sizes range from 8×10 all the way up to 20×28.

Once the prints are finished, they will be custom matted using cotton rag 4 ply board.

To sign up or ask a question, email Bob or Carissa

bob@alternativephotoservices.com

carissa@alternativephotoservices.com

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In/En Transition in Montreal

In/En Transition

June 12-17 | Reception June 14 6-9pm

Galerie Carte Blanche | 1853 Rue Amherst, Montreal

Philip Jessup,  Eliza Moore,  Liza Murzin,  Matthew Plexman,  Frances Patella, Bob Carnie

Eliza Moore

Eliza Moore

Frances Patella

Frances Patella

Matthew Plexman

Matthew Plexman

Philip Jessup

Philip Jessup

Liza Murzin

Lisa Murzin

Bob Carnie

Bob Carnie

Vancouver and Capture!

Carissa just returned from Vancouver where she was stationed for ten days. We rented a pop up space for two weeks in Chinatown, installing Series, Clearcut and Ipseity.

Series

From Front 2

SERIES brings together five photographers with five different stories to tell. Salina Kassam, Thomas Brasch, Larry D. Hayden and Skip Dean have explored their own environments through the photographic medium.


Clearcut

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The intersection of man and nature is a dominant theme in Matthew Plexman’s work. Clearcut captures the evolution of an old logging road in northeastern Ontario: old sections are blocked off and new routes added, leading to new areas of logging activity. The borders between clearcut and forest are abrupt at first—open areas of chewed-up earth and toppled trees abut untouched woodland. Over time, the process of healing begins and the borders blur. Plexman attempts to find beauty and symmetry in the tension between destruction and regeneration, inviting dialogue about the conflict inherent in our dependence on nature for both resource extraction and emotional sustenance.


 

Meeting New People

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Carissa had the pleasure of meeting some really interesting folks on her travels. Sally Buck and Kent Lins popped up their photos in cube vans every weekend during the Capture Photo Fest.

She also got a fantastic tour of the new Emily Carr University campus by photo studio tech Geoffrey, and met up with Kathy from Beau Photo.

With a bit of down time, she also got to take in some of the sights of Vancouver and Whistler.

 

 

In En Transition Spotlight: Guy Lafontaine

In/En Transition

March 1-31 2018  | Opening Reception March 2 | Artist talk March 3

In/En Transition presents an exchange of photography by exhibiting six Quebec artists in Toronto, and six Ontario artists in Montreal, reinforcing a sense of community between the two provinces.

Artists- Toronto- Connections Gallery
André DenisNathalie GarceauJudith BellavanceCaroline HayeurJean-Francois Leblanc, Guy Lafontaine

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How has your process changed over your career as a photographer?

My process has evolved from basic film cameras to medium format to large format cameras. Then to digital cameras, from basic ones to a higher end one. Through all my years in photography, I got to know and use a broad range of cameras and equipment. But I always saw the equipment I use only as tools that allow to bring to life my vision.

Using solely digital cameras for several years now, I see the benefits of ease of use and the bonus of seeing my results instantly. In the film days, any new project had its financial burden, with digital cameras the costs for a new project have gone down and allow me to consider more projects as feasible.

Bio

I have been living and working in Montreal for the last 30 years. Working as a professional mechanical designer for all my whole career, I have an insider’s view of the industrial environments, equipments and un-common places on which I get to intervene, either as a mechanical designer or as a photographer for my personal documentary projects. My dual background allows me to create visually strong and well structured images that can have a meaningful informative side as well.

As a self-educated photographer/curator, I evolved through the various projects that I create, slowly building myself a strong artistic experience along the way. As the american photographer Walker Evans stated, I describe myself as “documentary style” photographer. Subjects that I worked on through the years are: several large manufacturing industries (either about to close and or being drastically transformed), a major paper mill in the closing process, an hotel/convention centre complex being demolished, the largest nuclear bunker in Canada between it’s active and it’s museum period, hydro power plants, downtown store front reflections and various urban landscapes of humble worker’s houses alongside industrial sites, highways, railroads and major power lines.

In En Transition Spotlight: Caroline Hayeur

In/En Transition

March 1-31 2018  | Opening Reception March 2 | Artist talk March 3

In/En Transition presents an exchange of photography by exhibiting six Quebec artists in Toronto, and six Ontario artists in Montreal, reinforcing a sense of community between the two provinces.

Artists- Toronto- Connections Gallery
André DenisNathalie GarceauJudith Bellavance, Caroline Hayeur, Jean-Francois LeblancGuy Lafontaine

Shanghai

How has your process changed over your career as a photographer?
I have been working in documentary photography since the early 1990s, and making the transition to digital is definitely the biggest change I have had to go through. Although the change was a lot of work, I am not nostalgic about silver based photography. I embraced the new technology and started playing with these new possibilities, creating montages, digital patterns, and creating music videos and live multimedia performances. This has allowed me to expand my practice into movement and sound, as well as working in collaboration with multidisciplinary artists.

Bio

The ever-optimistic artist Caroline Hayeur focuses on themes of humanity, emotion and
connections between people through a practice deeply rooted in the present moment. Drawing on her experience of field photography since in the early 1990s, she is interested in concepts of place and home in various forms of relationship: friendship, families and broader communities.
In the spirit of documentary storytelling and humanistic portrait, her work illuminates
surprising connections between subjects through juxtaposition and proximity. Many of her projects began as artist residencies and community art, either in Quebec or internationally.
In 1997, FESTIVE RITUAL: PORTRAITS OF THE MONTREAL RAVE SCENE marked the
beginning of a long-term exploration into the world of nightlife and dance. After it’s exhibition during The Mois de la Photo à Montréal, the show toured worldwide through the FNAC Photo galleries (France, Europe and Asia) for over ten years. FESTIVE RITUAL, TANZ PARTY and later AMALGAT: DANSE, TRADITION ET AUTRES SPIRITUALITES (2003-2007) address the theme of the body-in- movement and have been presented as books, websites and exhibition tours. HUMANITAS, a series of portraits showing extreme emotion from birth to death, is presented several times in Quebec and also in Toulouse (France) during the festival ManifestO in 2013. With ADOLAND, she pursues her voyage in the world of adolescence. Her latest project named ABRAZO return in the field of dance, true the practice of tango from Buenos Aires to Montreal.
Since 1994, Caroline Hayeur has been a member of the Montreal-based Collectif Stock Photo — a group of independent photojournalists. In 2012, the collective celebrated its 25 th anniversary with the exhibition 25 YEARS OF STORIES under the artistic direction of Hayeur, with a dozen photographers presenting retrospective work at the Zoom Photo Festival Saguenay International
Meeting of Photojournalism. She was also Zoom speaker of honour in 2013. Hayeur collaborates among others with the ONF Interractif since the debuts of the studio.
Caroline Hayeur teaches photojournalism at l’École des médias, Faculty of communications at The Université du Québec à Montréal.

In En Transition Spotlight: André Denis

 

In/En Transition

March 1-31 2018  | Opening Reception March 2 | Artist talk March 3

In/En Transition presents an exchange of photography by exhibiting six Quebec artists in Toronto, and six Ontario artists in Montreal, reinforcing a sense of community between the two provinces.

Artists- Toronto- Connections Gallery
André Denis, Nathalie GarceauJudith BellavanceCaroline HayeurJean-Francois Leblanc, Guy Lafontaine

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How has your process changed over your career as a photographer?

The Turcot and Bonaventure projects lasted many many years. There was practically no end to the exploration and discovery. Actually, they had to demolish them to make me stop! But now I have started involving myself in very short term projects. One outing, followed by a selection of a dozen or so images, and printed in the form of a small book. Voilà! End of project. More focused in the image capture process, but also more freely associative in the final selection.

Bio

At the end of the seventies, André Denis was working as a freelance street photographer. His path led him to co-found Dazibao, a photography gallery and workshop venue. He was a part of its first shows: La Parole Sauvage and Un grand cru in Québec, and Explosition 80 in France. In 1982, his photography career was put on hiatus as he reoriented himself towards a different field.

In 2002, André revived his old passion and pursued his exploration of the city using his camera as his eyes. He made a long-term project of capturing the boroughs of the South-West of Montreal, with a special focus on the Turcot interchange and the Griffintown segment of the Bonaventure highway. A show featuring his studies of the Turcot interchange was put on at the Marie-Uguay cultural center in January of 2010, and then again at the Plateau Mont-Royal cultural center. His current goal is to showcase his work on the Bonaventure highway.

Artist Spotlight: Janet Holmes

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze

February 1-February 28

Opening Reception February 8 | Artist Talks February 10

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze presents six artists who are telling their stories through the photographic lens. Lisa Murzin, Shelagh Howard, Marlene Hilton Moore, Lorraine Parow, Janet Holmes and Lauren Young share a variety of work for this exhibition hailing from different backgrounds, generations and experiences.

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Statement

I have always loved animals, but for many years I was afraid to get involved with animal rescue because I couldn’t imagine how I would deal with the heartbreak. A few years ago, I decided that animals needed me more than I needed to be comfortable, and I began volunteering for animal rescue groups as a photographer and caregiver.
In January 2017, during my volunteer shift at the Wild Bird Fund in New York City, I met a hen who was suffering from severe and chronic reproductive illness. I discovered that her ailments were common for chickens like her. As I learned more about chickens, I discovered a network of vegans (primarily women) who rescue and care for them. I thought about how so many women still struggle to control their own bodies and obtain adequate reproductive health care, and how people in turn are socialized to exploit hens’ reproductive systems. Even across species, it seems that society expects to dictate how females use their own bodies.
And so I began photographing these chickens and their rescuers to pay tribute both to the birds who have suffered so much and the women who invest so much love, time and money caring for them.

How has your photographic process been informed by your experiences

As I spent more time experiencing animals as individuals through the lens of my camera, I began questioning how I could profess to love them yet continue exploiting them for food, clothing and other materials. I committed to become vegan and use photography to advocate for animal liberation.

My values as a vegan influence the subjects I photograph, the materials I use, and how I make photographs. For example, I avoid as much as possible any materials (like gelatin in traditional film and certain papers) that are derived from animals. As part of my photographic process, I sit with my animal subjects, witnessing their existence and importance as individuals, not objects. I invite them to experience me through sight, smell, touch and taste – on their own terms and in their own time. When possible, I photograph them at eye level to emphasize the parity between (human) viewer and subject.

In this series of portraits, I’ve expanded the frame to include animals with their rescuers. My goals are to highlight the deep bond between chickens and their people, pay tribute both to the birds who have suffered so much and the people who have invested so much time, money, love and tears in rescuing and caring for the birds, and encourage viewers to see chickens as sensitive beings worthy of our respect and protection.

50% of the profits from sales of work in this series will be donated to The Microsanctuary Movement’s Hen Reproductive Health Care Fund (www.microsanctuarymovement.org) to help caregivers cover the cost of contraception and other reproductive health care services provided by veterinarians.