Portraits of a Revolution: Marc Betsworth

Marc Betsworth 1

 

Portraits of a Revolution
March 1-31
Opening reception: March 1 6-9pm
Artist Talk: March 23 2-4pm

What is your process?

For these shots, I wanted to be as nimble as possible so I used a very simple one-light set up: a gridded beauty dish and a reflector – that’s it. I tended to use a gold reflector to warm up the tones. There’s a pattern of light I’m after and it can be elusive. It means playing with the angle of the reflector a lot. Beyond that,I focus on what my subject is giving me. Primarily, I’m looking for authentic moments – nothing too contrived. As a former musician, I find that music can be really helpful on that front. It inspires my approach and in a way, it can relax and direct the subject better than any verbal direction I can provide. Sometimes, if the music’s right, I can just sit back and wait until it naturally evokes the expression and mood I’m after.

The post process was a bit more involved. Given the era, I knew I wanted to employ a painterly look to the images but I didn’t want them to look too heavy handed or filtered. This meant applying a painterly texture as subtly as possible while preserving the “photographic” integrity of the image. Although I do use a tablet and tend to sculpt in the light, I’m not a fan of out-of-the-box “painterly” effects or brush strokes in a photographic image. To preserve authenticity and character, it was also important to ease up on the retouching.

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Artist Spotlight: Lauren Young

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze

February 1-February 28

Opening Reception February 8 | Artist Talks February 10

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze presents six artists who are telling their stories through the photographic lens. Lisa Murzin, Shelagh Howard, Marlene Hilton Moore, Lorraine Parow, Janet Holmes and Lauren Young share a variety of work for this exhibition hailing from different backgrounds, generations and experiences.

Ruby1-©LaurenCHoward.jpg

Statement

I think the mark of a good image is if it tells a good story. When I look at these images, I see a story about the relationship between young girls. It’s about the things we go through, the people we love or hate, and the looks we give each other when something interesting happens. I wanted to capture these faces so that I could look back on them and see the differences between ourselves now and then. This project allows me to document such a prevalent time in the lives of the people closest to me as we go through such pivotal shared experiences.

How has your photographic process been informed by your experiences

I photograph the things I see in life, the moments I experience. My goal for every picture I take is to capture an intimate moment shared between me and the subject, this is why having some sort of relationship with the subject is quite important to me. I am constantly trying to have unique experiences with those whom I photograph. Being a teenage girl myself, it makes the most sense for me to take pictures of my closest friends as they go through the same things I am.

Service Spotlight: Lith Prints from Digital File

 

Brendan Meadows

Image courtesy – Brendan Meadows

 

Now for something entirely different.

This image is a manipulated digital image, the file has been outputted to Ilford Ortho Film Using our Durst Lambda we inverted the file, flipped horizontal and imaged to 16 x 21 inches on the film using a combination of Red, Green and Blue laser light.

The film was then processed in the dark room in super oversized trays using HC110 developer, then stop then fix and wash as normal. The film is real film like that you would put in ones camera, except its the size of the final print. This film is then placed on silver gelatin paper and with a large sheet of glass a contact exposure is made and using the Lith Process the resulting image is obtained after the full Ilford Archival process and Selenium toning.

This process opens many doors for photographers who do not have the space or expertise to operate an enlarger, and or may have never made a film negative in years. This process will work with any digital file and is exceptionally perfect for silver contact print

 

Artist Spotlight: Janet Holmes

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze

February 1-February 28

Opening Reception February 8 | Artist Talks February 10

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze presents six artists who are telling their stories through the photographic lens. Lisa Murzin, Shelagh Howard, Marlene Hilton Moore, Lorraine Parow, Janet Holmes and Lauren Young share a variety of work for this exhibition hailing from different backgrounds, generations and experiences.

JHolmes-05.jpg

Statement

I have always loved animals, but for many years I was afraid to get involved with animal rescue because I couldn’t imagine how I would deal with the heartbreak. A few years ago, I decided that animals needed me more than I needed to be comfortable, and I began volunteering for animal rescue groups as a photographer and caregiver.
In January 2017, during my volunteer shift at the Wild Bird Fund in New York City, I met a hen who was suffering from severe and chronic reproductive illness. I discovered that her ailments were common for chickens like her. As I learned more about chickens, I discovered a network of vegans (primarily women) who rescue and care for them. I thought about how so many women still struggle to control their own bodies and obtain adequate reproductive health care, and how people in turn are socialized to exploit hens’ reproductive systems. Even across species, it seems that society expects to dictate how females use their own bodies.
And so I began photographing these chickens and their rescuers to pay tribute both to the birds who have suffered so much and the women who invest so much love, time and money caring for them.

How has your photographic process been informed by your experiences

As I spent more time experiencing animals as individuals through the lens of my camera, I began questioning how I could profess to love them yet continue exploiting them for food, clothing and other materials. I committed to become vegan and use photography to advocate for animal liberation.

My values as a vegan influence the subjects I photograph, the materials I use, and how I make photographs. For example, I avoid as much as possible any materials (like gelatin in traditional film and certain papers) that are derived from animals. As part of my photographic process, I sit with my animal subjects, witnessing their existence and importance as individuals, not objects. I invite them to experience me through sight, smell, touch and taste – on their own terms and in their own time. When possible, I photograph them at eye level to emphasize the parity between (human) viewer and subject.

In this series of portraits, I’ve expanded the frame to include animals with their rescuers. My goals are to highlight the deep bond between chickens and their people, pay tribute both to the birds who have suffered so much and the people who have invested so much time, money, love and tears in rescuing and caring for the birds, and encourage viewers to see chickens as sensitive beings worthy of our respect and protection.

50% of the profits from sales of work in this series will be donated to The Microsanctuary Movement’s Hen Reproductive Health Care Fund (www.microsanctuarymovement.org) to help caregivers cover the cost of contraception and other reproductive health care services provided by veterinarians.

 

Artist Spotlight: Marlene Hilton Moore

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze

February 1-February 28

Opening Reception February 8 | Artist Talks February 10

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze presents six artists who are telling their stories through the photographic lens. Lisa Murzin, Shelagh Howard, Marlene Hilton Moore, Lorraine Parow, Janet Holmes and Lauren Young share a variety of work for this exhibition hailing from different backgrounds, generations and experiences.

Pixie's World Animation 1 Levels2_eml.jpg

Statement

I enjoy the collective within the world of women. In my photographs I see each woman
through my own eyes first and I orchestrate the scene to my version of them. Once the
scene is set I abandon to the joy of discovery as each woman reveals herself
unencumbered by my vision. Fleeting glances, pointed gaze, body language all reveal a
distinctive identity.

How has your photographic process been informed by your experiences

Two accidental elements in my initial photo shoot contributed to my photographic process – continuous motion and specific light. In this initial series, Pixie’s World, I instructed the woman to constantly move so that she would forget about the camera and be her natural self. I shot continuously and the result was full of narrative. I also discovered as a result of the movement that many of the blurred images were not discards but were mysterious and valuable. Each of my photo shoots now involves hundreds of images and these images provide a story-telling reality even within my mise en scène conceptual approach.
In this initial photo shoot also I used a single available light source that created a spotlight effect to unusual results. In subsequent shoots I used the light of the moment – natural daylight diffused through historic barn boards, brilliant sea light and blistering city and beach sun played their part.
I realized that reacting instinctively to the moment, the woman and the place was an asset, which became my mandate in all subsequent sessions.

Artist Spotlight: Shelagh Howard

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze

February 1-February 28

Opening Reception February 8 | Artist Talks February 10

Through a Lens: Our Female Gaze presents six artists who are telling their stories through the photographic lens. Lisa Murzin, Shelagh Howard, Marlene Hilton Moore, Lorraine Parow, Janet Holmes and Lauren Young share a variety of work for this exhibition hailing from different backgrounds, generations and experiences.

ThreeGraces_1086©ShelaghHoward

Statement

When photographing the body rather than focusing on the face, the image for me
becomes much more about the essence of people, rather than about the individual being
photographed. The blurred motion shadows that follow and surround these figures evoke our ability to carry within us multitudes – often simultaneously, always over time. We can be with others but alone, or alone but connected. A single moment can embody rage, calm, love, uncertainty, passion, and fear, as well as memories of previous moments. A fleeting instant in a person’s life can arguably be documented by a portrait. It is the question of exploring the diversity of experience that we hold within us that this work examines.

How has your photographic process been informed by your experiences

We all move through the world in our bodies. They carry evidence of our genetics, as
well as the ways we choose to alter, adorn and present them. I have walked through the
world as a girl and then as a woman, and there is no question that this experience has
influenced the way I have been seen, as well as the way I have perceived myself. With
the #metoo movement gaining force all around us, the fact that being a woman carries
with it many vulnerabilities and disadvantages needs no introduction nor debate. The flip side of that is the powerful sisterhood that women possess, evidenced by the phenomenal support for the women’s marches we have seen in the past year, and also in the way we have cared for each other on a daily basis, throughout history. We are daughters, sisters, mothers, friends, mentors, partners. As communicators and nurturers, we touch, hold, listen and hear. We struggle, are joyous, hurt, and soothe, ourselves and each other. We are naked often literally, but also figuratively: raw, open and vulnerable with each other in a way will always fascinate me, and which I am driven to explore and to capture.

 

2017 in Review

2017 saw us renaming the main gallery, changing from the Dylan Ellis Gallery to the Connections Gallery. This name change reflects our mandate to “connect” artists, curators and gallerists.

Thank you to all of the photographers who showed such an amazing variety of images.

 

Human memory / The soul of the earth

January 12 to January 31

Sylvie Pinsonneault, Karl Desmarais


Toronto Offsite Design Festival

January 16-January 22

SUMO Projects and artist Michele Guevara


Visual Calculus in Photography

March 3-31

Alain Laforest, Catherine Aboumrad, Daniel Miller, Guy Glorieux, Guy Lafontaine

Jean Lauzon, Marie-Reine Mattera and Emmanuel Joly, Robert Slatkoff


A Foundation of Ash

April 17-May 13

Will Gill


Alternative Photo Revolution

Glen Echo, Maryland March 28, New Orleans March 31/April 1 Toronto, Contact Photography Festival May 15-June 17

Alexis Jackson, Kin Lon Ma, Scott Davis, David Armentor, Marc Betsworth, Tamiko Winters, Paul Taborovsky, Kevin Kelly, Alan Dunlop, Lisa Murzin, Ron Erwin,  John Migicovsky, Evan Dion, Salina Kassam, Philip Jessup, Marlene Hilton Moore, Juli Lyons, Skip Dean, Thomas Brasch, Matthew Plexman, Laura Paterson, Bob Carnie, Monica Glitz, Jeff Suchak, Hugues Rochette, Jean Lauzon, Madeleine Marcil, Claude Dagenais, Guy Lafontaine, Mirabelle Ricard, Guy Glorieux, Brittany Fleming, Jennifer Crane, Brendan Meadows, Andrej Gregov, Larry Hayden, Bryan Helm, Ginette Clément, Stephen McNeill , David Christensen


Linked

July 8-August 31

Laura Paterson, Wayne Salmon, Al Paterson, Anthony Macri, Kamelia Pezeshki, Aurélien Muller, Carissa Ainslie, Beth Jessup, Paulette Michayluk, Bob Carnie


Urban

October 1-30

Stephanie Kretzschmer, Guy Lafontaine, Robert McIntyre, Joachim Oepkes, David Edwards and Alan Dunlop


Kindred

Montreal October 20 & 21, Toronto November 1-29

Linda Kooluris Dobbs, Salina Kassam

John Migicovsky, Juli Lyons, Lisa Murzin, Thomas Brasch, Bob Carnie, Shelagh Howard, Marlene Hilton Moore, Philip Jessup, David L Hunsberger, ​Anthony DeLorenzo, Normand Blouin, Suzanne Vo-Ho, Jean-Sébastien Vaillancourt, Nathalie Garceau, Daniel Miller, Alexia Righetti, Pierre Dalpé, Guy Glorieux, Céline Lalonde, Martine Michaud, Janick Houle, Francois Spenard​


Emergence

December 1-January 8

Lindsi Hollend, Anna Borcherdt, Adrian Oosterman, Cat Stambolic, Andrew Persaud, Marlene Hilton Moore, Raquel Moliterno