Vancouver and Capture!

Carissa just returned from Vancouver where she was stationed for ten days. We rented a pop up space for two weeks in Chinatown, installing Series, Clearcut and Ipseity.

Series

From Front 2

SERIES brings together five photographers with five different stories to tell. Salina Kassam, Thomas Brasch, Larry D. Hayden and Skip Dean have explored their own environments through the photographic medium.


Clearcut

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The intersection of man and nature is a dominant theme in Matthew Plexman’s work. Clearcut captures the evolution of an old logging road in northeastern Ontario: old sections are blocked off and new routes added, leading to new areas of logging activity. The borders between clearcut and forest are abrupt at first—open areas of chewed-up earth and toppled trees abut untouched woodland. Over time, the process of healing begins and the borders blur. Plexman attempts to find beauty and symmetry in the tension between destruction and regeneration, inviting dialogue about the conflict inherent in our dependence on nature for both resource extraction and emotional sustenance.


 

Meeting New People

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Carissa had the pleasure of meeting some really interesting folks on her travels. Sally Buck and Kent Lins popped up their photos in cube vans every weekend during the Capture Photo Fest.

She also got a fantastic tour of the new Emily Carr University campus by photo studio tech Geoffrey, and met up with Kathy from Beau Photo.

With a bit of down time, she also got to take in some of the sights of Vancouver and Whistler.

 

 

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Matthew Plexman: Clearcut Q&A Pt 2

November 2-30

Opening Reception November 10 6pm-9pm

Uncomfortably beautiful, large format panoramas of clear-cuts in Northern Ontario. Plexman presents these massively altered and rearranged landscapes not for what was taken away, but for what the loggers left behind, and how Nature reclaims and repairs the damage.

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How did you start out photographing? 

When I was 11 years old, my sister gave me a plastic “Diana” camera for my birthday while our family was on a weekend camping trip to Pinery Provincial Park.  This was the start of my love for landscape photography- I had to go to the park gift shop twice to buy extra film.

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