In En Transition Spotlight: Guy Lafontaine

In/En Transition

March 1-31 2018  | Opening Reception March 2 | Artist talk March 3

In/En Transition presents an exchange of photography by exhibiting six Quebec artists in Toronto, and six Ontario artists in Montreal, reinforcing a sense of community between the two provinces.

Artists- Toronto- Connections Gallery
André DenisNathalie GarceauJudith BellavanceCaroline HayeurJean-Francois Leblanc, Guy Lafontaine

Ballroom.jpg

How has your process changed over your career as a photographer?

My process has evolved from basic film cameras to medium format to large format cameras. Then to digital cameras, from basic ones to a higher end one. Through all my years in photography, I got to know and use a broad range of cameras and equipment. But I always saw the equipment I use only as tools that allow to bring to life my vision.

Using solely digital cameras for several years now, I see the benefits of ease of use and the bonus of seeing my results instantly. In the film days, any new project had its financial burden, with digital cameras the costs for a new project have gone down and allow me to consider more projects as feasible.

Bio

I have been living and working in Montreal for the last 30 years. Working as a professional mechanical designer for all my whole career, I have an insider’s view of the industrial environments, equipments and un-common places on which I get to intervene, either as a mechanical designer or as a photographer for my personal documentary projects. My dual background allows me to create visually strong and well structured images that can have a meaningful informative side as well.

As a self-educated photographer/curator, I evolved through the various projects that I create, slowly building myself a strong artistic experience along the way. As the american photographer Walker Evans stated, I describe myself as “documentary style” photographer. Subjects that I worked on through the years are: several large manufacturing industries (either about to close and or being drastically transformed), a major paper mill in the closing process, an hotel/convention centre complex being demolished, the largest nuclear bunker in Canada between it’s active and it’s museum period, hydro power plants, downtown store front reflections and various urban landscapes of humble worker’s houses alongside industrial sites, highways, railroads and major power lines.

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